Upper Income Males Will No Longer Wear Under Armour

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Piper Jaffray Companies (PJC) has released results from its 35th semi-annual “Taking Stock with Teens” survey and they indicate that Under Armour (UAA) remains out of favor with Generation Z, “boxed out by resurgent Adidas and retro-category”. The company was the No. 1 label males most often cited as an “old” brand, for the 3rd straight survey; while the company debuted on the list of brands females won’t wear, at No. 10. Footwear sales are struggling, with the brand falling 10 spots to 24th overall; but, perhaps most concerning, UAA has lost the upper-income male demographic. 12% of upper-income males said they would no longer wear the label, compared to just 2% in 2017. Adidas (No. 1 “new” brand for males, No. 2 for females), Vans (highest mindshare for footwear among upper-income females), Supreme (No. 5 “up and coming” male brand) and Champion (moved into Top 10 among upper-income males) were among the survey’s biggest winners.

Howie Long-Short: It been a rough 2 weeks for UAA, or at least their PR team. On March 31st, the company’s fitness app, MyFitnessPal (bought for $475 million), was hacked; resulting in as many as 150 million users having their personal information stolen (though, no payment details were accessed). Then on April 2nd, analysts at Morgan Stanley and Credit Suisse wrote separate notes stating UAA merchandise sales had fallen below 10% of Dick’s Sporting Goods (DKS) total sales and that the company is at risk of being replaced by private labels. Despite all the negative news, share prices have increased 2.5% (to $16.74) since the March 29th close; the last day before this string of negative publicity hit. The company will report Q1 ’18 earnings on April 26th.

Fan Marino: With the share price down 13% YoY and a publicly stated goal to becoming “more operationally efficient”, Under Armour has decided to pass on hosting a hospitality tent at this year’s Preakness Stakes; a traditional day of celebration for the company. They won’t be the only ones sitting this one out. Ticket sales for the event are depressed, down 30% YoY in the infield and 4% YoY “in the building”. Of course, the event drew a record 140,327 fans last year.

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Author: John Wall Street

At the intersection of sports & finance.

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