Bradley Chubb Discusses the Value of His Name and Likeness

Chubb

Panini America is the exclusive trading card partner of the NFL and NFLPA. Denver Broncos 1st round selection Bradley Chubb (#5 overall) was in Los Angeles on Thursday afternoon, at the NFLPA Rookie Premier and found some time to talk with JohnWallStreet about the value of his name and likeness and the marketing deals he’s signed since turning pro.

JWS: Panini digital trading cards enable players to capitalize on draft night excitement. Did having near-instant access to shareable team branded content help you build your social media following in the minutes/hours after the Commissioner called your name?

Bradley: It did, it built it up a lot for me. It helped me build my brand and helped people to see who I was. When the Broncos made the pick, I know everybody wanted to see the card. I feel like when they (Panini) pushed that out, it helped me out a lot; I got like 50,000 followers. 

JWS: You signed a shoe and apparel contract with Adidas. Basketball players tend to begin relationships with sneaker companies on the AAU level. When did you first begin to use Adidas products?

Bradley: I used Adidas all throughout college. NC State was an Adidas school, so that’s when I really started using the brand and fell in love with it. In high school, I had teammates that would wear Adidas but I always had Nike because I got cleats from my brother. He was at Wake Forest (Nike school) and was giving me his extra cleats.

JWS: Baker Mayfield suggested that if you added up all the marketing deals he’s signed since turning pro, that they would be worth $1 million – $2 million. Does the consensus (minus Cleveland) top defensive player in the draft command similar numbers?

Bradley: No, he’s a quarterback (and Heisman winner) – it definitely goes up for him. As a defensive guy, I made a good amount of money; but, I don’t think it was in the millions or anything like that.       

Editor Note: It’s worth pointing out that in addition to Bradley’s Panini America and Adidas (ADDYY) deals, he’s done marketing deals with both Bose and Old Spice (PG).

Howie Long-Short: As a consensus Top 5 pick, Bradley could have hired a contract attorney, negotiated his own rookie contract and saved himself at least 1% (as much as 3%) in agent fees. Chubb said he never considered doing that, explaining he was “more comfortable” going with his brother’s agent; Erik Burkhardt of Select Sports Group. I would have advised against it (see: rookie scale), but Bradley shouldn’t have any financial issues; he’s going to sign a rookie deal with a total contract value +/- $27.5 million.

Fan Marino: Panini’s trading card index (released quarterly) ranks the top-performing football players in the licensed trading card industry, on factors ranging from secondary-market transactions to collectability based on rookie hype and collector speculation. The newest ranking, released on May 16th, has Chubb as the 11th ranked rookie (top 10 were offensive players); behind 2nd round pick Nick Chubb (his cousin, Browns) and 3rd round pick Mason Rudolph (Steelers). I asked Bradley, if he were to win NFL defensive rookie of the year, how high does he think he could reach on the list?

Bradley: “Pretty high. It just depends on if I go out there and handle business. I mean, it’s good to say all this stuff before the season – if I just go out there and focus on what is important, all the stuff like this (the accolades) will come later.”

Fan: Bigger deal for you? Meeting Von Miller or John Elway?

Bradley: Definitely, John Elway. I met him at the combine and I was star struck.

Looking for Chubb’s rookie card? You can get Panini’s NFL trading card products online at iCollectPanini.com, hobby shops nationwide and retailers including Walmart and Target.

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Rule 40 Prevents Olympic Athletes from Cashing in During Games

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IOC bylaws designed to provide exclusivity to official IOC sponsors (paying a reported $100 million over 4 years, or more), effectively prevent Olympic athletes from monetizing their own likeness; both during the Games and the days leading up to and following competition (Feb 1-Feb 28). Violations of Rule 40, the specific regulation that forbids the unauthorized public use of athlete names, images or reference to their Olympic performance in commercial advertisements, are subject to litigation. For reference purposes, GE, Coca-Cola (KO), Procter and Gamble (PG) and Visa (V) are among the official worldwide sponsors of the Pyeongchang Winter Oympics.

Howie Long-Short: Despite the staggering dollars the IOC earns from its official sponsors, the organization managed to lose money in 2017; $99 million after adjustments. Though, the figure lacks significance in a non-Games year. The organization saw an increase in sponsorship income ($493.2 million) relative to 2016 ($410 million) and a drastic rise when compared with the same stage, in the last Olympic cycle ($141.5 million).

Fan Marino: Savvy Tinder users are altering their location to Pyeongchang, to find love…in the notoriously sexually-charged, Olympic Village. Tinder Passport, a feature that allows paying users to change their location (so they can connect with people anywhere), has seen a 1,850% increase in “passporting” to the Olympic Villages. While overall usage (+348%), right swipes (+565%) and matches (+644%) are all up too, parents of Olympians should rest assured; organizers have arranged for an Olympic record 37 condoms per athlete, at the Pyeongchang Games.

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Winter Olympic Sponsors Require Winning and Compelling Storyline

The Pyeongchang Games start on February 9th, but winter Olympians are finding corporate sponsorship opportunities difficult to come by; particularly for those that compete in smaller sports, that don’t have a U.S. following. Athletes that win and have a compelling story are the ones landing corporate sponsorship deals. Slopestyle skier Gus Kenworthy, who won silver in Sochi and is publicly gay, has signed deals with Toyota (TM), United (UAL), Visa (V), Procter & Gamble (PG) and Deloitte. His sexuality is worth noting because human rights groups say that sexual minorities’ rights are not always protected in South Korea; a country where having homosexual relations is punishable by up to 2 years in prison.

Howie Long-Short: Becoming an Olympian is an expensive endeavor. Richard Parsons estimates that it has cost more than $500,000 to get his children (Rachel and Michael, an ice dance team) to cusp of the ‘22 Olympics. It’s unlikely he’ll ever recoup the money. Gold medals are worth just $25,000 in the U.S. and even the USOC acknowledges that most athletes cannot earn enough from their sports to make a living. That’s not the case everywhere though, gold medals are worth $952,000 in Taiwan and $746,000 in Singapore.

Fan Marino: Frigid weather is likely to affect both athletes and fans at the Pyeongchang Games, with the average February temperatures (with wind chill) there in the single digits. The newly built 35,000-seat stadium that will host the opening and closing ceremonies (up to 5 hours long) doesn’t include a roof and it’s too late and expensive to build one now. For those attending, fear not; organizers have promised portable heaters in the isles, blankets and heating pads.

Medals are nice, but sometimes not enough for Olympic athletes seeking sponsors

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FS1 LAUNCHES NYC BASED MORNING SHOW TO COMPETE WITH SPORTSCENTER AM

Just one week after ESPN (DIS) introduced “SportsCenter AM”, FS1 (FOXA) introduced its newest morning show, “First Things First”. The show pairs NFL Hall of Fame WR Chris Carter with Nick Wright and Jenna Wolfe, airing weekdays at 6:30 a.m., 30 minutes prior to its ESPN counterpart. The “First Things First” debut was particularly noteworthy for FS1, as it becomes the first ever NYC based show for the Los Angeles based network and the first time the network has had a presenting sponsor (PG) for a show’s launch. The 3-hour show gives FS1 11 hours of live daytime studio programming daily, as the network continues to move away from highlights and towards discussion/debate.

Howie Long-Short: FS1 has seen their show “Undisputed” with Skip Bayless and Shannon Sharpe grow 1,260% over the last year, to 137,000 viewers. The show actually beat SportsCenter in the 10a-Noon time slot for 2 consecutive weeks in August. Having a live lead-in is only going to help those numbers grow.

Fan Marino: Why did FS1 move “First Things First” to NYC? It’s simply not practical to produce a show that starts at 3 a.m. local time. Even if you could, it would be nearly impossible to book guests. Speaking of guests, moving to the East Coast gives the network access to a whole different group of potential on-set guests.

FS1 looks to establish NY, early-morning presence with ‘First Things First’